Dao Chuan (Daoist Tai Chi)

The Tai Chi of the Universal Source
Yuanshi - Taiji



Original T'ai Chi Ch'uan

This form stems from the White Cloud Temple Monastery (Beijing) and the Sam Ching Mei Monastery. It is a precious jewel, kept secret and not to be taught to the unworthy. This form is taught by On Sing Yuen, 15th generation practitioner. Although nearly 90 years old he is still active and lively. He was taught by the Head Monk of the White Cloud and by another monk, Gao Foo Sun. He practised hard every day, discovering the essence ot T'ai Chi. To ensure that it does not die out he has decided to bring it into the open.

This original T'ai Chi form is sophisticated and rich in martial content, very practical. It contains fast and slow movements. The internal force comes from within.
It has four main principles:
1. Movement.
2. Stillness.
3. Fast.
4. Slow.

There are thirteen postures and twelve actions.
1. Flow with no tension. Co-ordinate with the in and out breath.
2. Stillness is very important.
3. Five movements are like a tiger pouncing on its prey. These movements are spirited and solid.
4. Slow - concentration on breath and flow-mind/energy will join together.

This form is hard and soft, fast and slow. Do not be rigid. Fast movements must be precise and focused. Yield and use stillness. Size up the opponent. Be aware of everything. Discover their weakness.

Of the postures 164 are to do with stillness.

Foreword

Guan Yu Martial Arts for Tai Chi, Tiger Claw Kung Fu and Bagua in Hertfordshire (Herts)

The Tai Chi of the Universal Source is a Taoist martial art, historically regarded by Taoists as a secret treasure not to be transmitted outside the tradition. Taoist master An Shengyuan of the White Cloud Temple in Beijing, a 15th generation bearer of the "Zhi" tradition of the San Qing Wei Sect, is already in his nineties. He studied with the abbot of the White Cloud Temple, then later studied with Master GaoHuchen.

Under the instruction of these two masters, 10 years of hard study and tough practice passed as a single day, until he became a true disciple of Taoist Tai Chi. Now, Master An has decided to make the Tai Chi of the Universal Source public, in order that it should not be lost to future generations.

The Tai Chi of the Universal Source (also called Primordial Beginnings), is a rich tradition comprising many forms, and a rigorous structure. It is practical, relaxing the whole body frame, with indirect properties, with the external body movements giving rise to internal energy movements. Practised up to a certain level, it can build a real basis for a unique style, enabling the practitioner to [according to second pulse Zhou heaven moving into].



The Taoist Tai Chi of the Universal Source

Guan Yu Martial Arts for Tai Chi, Tiger Claw Kung Fu and Bagua in Hertfordshire (Herts)

This form of Tai Chi is a tradition handed down by the Emperor Xuanyuan, who based it on his witnessing of a battle between a snake and a magpie. According to the records, the Emperor was walking in front of a slope one day when he saw a magpie and a snake struggling with each other, closely entangled. When the magpie attached the snake's tail, the snake's head came to the rescue; when the magpie attacked the head, the head and tail linked together.

The Emperor was most surprised when he saw this, and created a Tai Chi form as a result. It was later taken up by

the Taoist Adept Zhang Sanfeng ("Three Harvests Zhang") and other Taoist masters who augmented it in practice according to the movements of flying birds and walking beasts, cooking fighting techniques and the preservation of life and health together on the same stove. This produce a boxing form that was peculiarly Taoist, comprising dynamic, still, fast and slow sections.

Section 1 — Dynamism

This section is the dynamic section, consisting of 13 forms. It should be practised with a moving energy of intent flowing through all points of the body.


Section 2— Stillness

This section is important as regards technique.


Section 3—Speed

The fast section also has 13 forms, or a total of 12 movement sets. It requires fierceness, violence, speed and hardness.


Section 4—Slowness

This section is also called the ritual of the four directions, requiring the generation of intent via the eight trigrams of the Ba Gua. Intent becomes energy, energy becomes power, until there is a corresponding tension between intent and energy (qi). An internal harmony between intent, energy and power results occurs, and the deployment of gong (qi in the body) and of power.

1. Power - Hard and soft should be in balance. Only then is there completion. Only hardness with no soft is incomplete; only softness with no hardness is unsteady.
2. Speed - Fast and slow should be in balance. Too fast lacks freedom; too slow lacks energy. The two should combine to make flexibility. In this way one can have strength without rigidity, softness without weakness, speed without losing control, and slowness without wavering.
3. Technique - There is an emphasis on a return to emptiness, movement arising from stillness. But even more attention should be paid to the spirit behind the movements, to the positions of hands and feet, entering the forms riding on emptiness, movements coming out of the abyss.

The characteristics of meditational movement is that the energy in movements such as touch, adhesion, continuity, following, soft/continuous, rolling, turning, are as if [picking the essence of water depending on the elbows?]. The "following" movement, once it has been practised up to a certain level, will result in the transfer of external energy to internal energy, with a free circulation of energy through all the meridians and systems, setting up the generation and circulation of qi within the body and giving rise to considerable power (gong).



Tai Chi of the Universal Source

Yuanshi-Taiji

1. Empty form
2. Two hands cudgel sun and moon
3. Two hands press down
4. Divide the hands
5. Hold the ball
6. Getting the snake to come out of the hole (squeeze)
7. Clasp hands
8. Grabbing the magpie's tail
9. Single whip
10. Hold the ball
11. Squeeze/press hands (ji)
12. Lift hands upwards form
13. White crane spreads its wings
14. Holding the head and protecting the summit
15. Embrace the knees, stretch out the palms
16. Withdraw step, lift up robe/clothes
17. Embrace knees, stretch out palms
18. Advance, hold head, protect summit
19. Advance, embrace knees, stretch out palms
20. Withdraw, lift up robe
21. Embrace knees, stretch out palms
22. Advance, hold head, protect the summit
23. Embrace knees, stretch out palms
24. Brush off the dust
25. Hand presses the lute
26. Cicada grabs hand
27. Step forward seven stars
28. Move/shove, Block, Hammer
29. Closed like a seal (on a letter)
30. Opening step form
31. Follow palms cross the hands
32. Squeeze (ji)
33. Single whip
34. Stubborn hands carry the tiger back to the mountain
35. Left form stubborn hands carry the tiger back to the mountain
36. Single whip
37. Plate hands (open palm)
38. Left hand open palm strike
39. Grope the fish
40. Bottom of elbow, see hammer
41. (backwards) Repulse the monkey
42. Right form repulse monkey
43. Diagonal/slanting flying form
44. Two [unreadable character] hands
45. Press hands
46. Lift hands
47. White crane spreads its wings
48. Embrace knees, stretch out palms
49. Tread palms
50. Lift the curtains
51. Point block palm
52. Duck/dodge through the back
53. Withdraw body hammer
54. Retreat step, plant hammer
55. Advance step, grab the magpie's tail
56. Single whip
57. Flat cloud hand
58. Left form cloud hand
59. Right form cloud hand
60. Single whip
61. Extend high hand to horse
62. Clasp hands turn circle hand
63. Lift right foot
64. Left form turn, change hand
65. Right form turn, change hand
66. Lift left leg
67. Front lift, behind kick
68. Embrace knees, extend palms
69. Right form hold head, protect the summit
70. Embrace knees, extend palms
71. Advance step seven stars
72. Advance and plant hammer
73. Slow move waist, through to hammer
74. Retreat body, hammer
75. Flat elbow
76. To one side, tread leg
77. Right stamp give foot
78. Advance step through to hammer
79. Advance step through to hammer
80. Clasp hands turn circle hands
81. Right lift foot
82. Fishing the moon from the bottom of the sea
83. Golden dragon coiled and twisted
84. Hit the tiger form
85. Shake the hammer
86. Left hit the tiger form
87. Twin elbows summit behind
88. Right extend leg
89. Golden child makes a gift of wine
90. Step back yin palm
91. Servant palm
92. Palm leg set off together
93. Sleeping fish form
94. Twin peaks through to ears
95. Revolving wind legs
96. Step yin palms
97. Starting step seven stars
98. Advance, Shove, Block, Hammer
99. Clasp hands, protect wrist
100. Closed like a seal
101. Cudgel hands
102. Cross hands
103. Left hand firm/reinforce
104. Right slanting flying
105. Left slanting flying
106. Right Jade Lady Threads the Shuttle
107. Left Jade Lady Threads the Shuttle
108. Right slanting flying form
109. Right Jade Lady Threads the Shuttle
110. One Crane Flies Diagonally
111. Single whip
112. High cloud hands
113. Left form high cloud hands
114. Single whip
115. Fishing the dragon from the bottom of the sea
116. Lift step, seven stars
117. Fishing the dragon from the bottom of the sea
118. Golden rooster stands by itself
119. Mantis plays with the cicada
120. Straight ahead repulse the monkey
121. Diagonal flying form
122. Press/Squeeze hands
123. White crane spreads its wings
124. Thousand pounds falling elbows
125. The needle at the bottom of the sea
126. Follow on struggle hands
127. Opening step, struggle hands
128. Backwards hit the whip
129. Summit fist
130. Rolling palms
131. Summit fist
132. Squeeze elbow
133. Two hands cudgel sun and moon
134. Two hands press down
135. Two hands cudgel sun and moon
136. Crab style cloud hands
137. Left crab style cloud hands
138. Single whip
139. Right press elbow
140. Left press elbow
141. Push the window to look at the moon
142. Phoenix shows off its feathers
143. Right form phoenix shows off its feathers
144. The rising snake spits out a message/trust
145. The moon on the horizon
146. Two place lotus legs
147. Bend the bow to shoot the tiger
148. Two elbows pushing aside
149. Right form, bend the bow to shoot the tiger
150. Assault flat hands
151. Retreat body, hammer
152. Advance step, extend high hand to horse
153. Single whip
154. Assault hand defeat form
155. Bow stance, lift palms
156. Two hands, advance seven stars
157. Retreat step, straddle the tiger
158. Turn body, thread palms
159. Advance, thread palms
160. Advance, rush fist(s)
161. Single whip
162. Turn body, cloud hands
163. Left form, turn body, cloud hands
164. Embrace the Taiji



White Cloud Temple

The source
Yuanshi - Taiji
Bai Yun Guan, Beijing

In the 8th century, the Tian Chang Temple was built in Beijing to house a statue of Lao Tzu. Although it burned down in 1202, the statue was saved. In 1224, Genghis Khan ordered the reconstruction of the temple. It came to be known as the White Cloud Temple. Today it is one of China's oldest and largest Taoist temples, housing the office of Taoist Association of China.

Guan Yu Martial Arts for Tai Chi, Tiger Claw Kung Fu and Bagua in Hertfordshire (Herts)

In Chinese, Taoist temples are not actually called temples, but Guan. Guan means something like to look at or observe. This is a reflection of the Taoist belief that understanding the Tao comes from a direct observation of nature, rather than scholastic theological studies.

Here are some images of the Temple taken on a full moon Sunday, which is a popular time for Taoists to visit. It is especially popular with Cantonese, whose dialect and fashion stand out from local Beijing residents. The temple is one of the most entertaining I've visited with lots of activities for visitors.

The White Cloud Temple Of Beijing, China is located outside Xibianmen in Beijing. It is one of "The Three Great Ancestral Courts" of the Complete Perfection Sect of Taoism, and is titled "The First Temple under Heaven".

In the 8th century, the Tian Chang Temple was built in Beijing to house a statue of Lao Tzu. Although it burned down in 1202, the statue was saved . In 1224, Genghis Khan ordered the reconstruction of the temple. It came to be known as the White Cloud Temple. Today it is one of China's oldest and largest Taoist temples, housing the office of Taoist Association of China. In Chinese, Taoist temples are not actually called temples, but Guan. Guan means something like to look at or observe.

This is a reflection of the Taoist belief that understanding the Tao comes from a direct observation of nature, rather than scholastic theological studies. The arches at the front have detailed traditional images including two hidden monkeys. Visitors believe it is lucky to find and touch them. Just inside the entrance is a bridge crossing over nothing in particular. Under the bridge are oversized Chinese coins with bells in the middle. For a couple of dollars you can buy a bunch of fake coins to throw at the bells. It is said to be lucky if you can hit the bell with a coin throwing from either side. nside the Temple for the Immortal Qui is a detailed model of scenes from the life of this very impressive Taoist Ancient.

Guan Yu Martial Arts for Tai Chi, Tiger Claw Kung Fu and Bagua in Hertfordshire (Herts)

Born to a good family in Shan Dong in 1148, Master Qui Chang Chun, had an excellent memory and quick wit from an early age. He studied Taoism for many years and came to live in a cave in Shan Xi. He was nicknamed, Sir Palm Bark Raincoat, because of his habit of bringing a simple raincoat and bamboo hat wherever he went. ater, his wisdom attracted invitations from powerful emperors. He turned down several invitations to accept the most inconvenient and dangerous of all: an audience with Genghis Khan. After journeying for two years with 18 disciples to meet the Khan, his reasons became apparent.The two got on very well. After a while Genghis Khan asked Qui's advice on ruling well. Qui counselled him to show restraint in killing. On the issue of longevity, he recommended easing the mind and avoiding excessive desires. It is said this meeting encouraged Khan to soften his brutal ways to the benefit of his subjects. Qui's journey had been worthwhile.